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City Market

City Market City Market City Market City Market City Market City Market City Market City Market

No supermarket can replace the charm of the personal contact with the vendor of the excitement of the unpredictable purchase at the main Rijeka market – Placa.


The main City Market has been the place chosen by the people of Rijeka as the best place to dine since the 19th century. It developed next to the sea shore, near the wooden pier, where the local fishermen used to unload their catch and take it in baskets to the market to sell. Fish, crabs and seashells were first sold in the open, but in 1866 a fish market was erected. In line with the project by Izidor Vauchnig, the director of Rijeka's Office for Architecture, the construction of two pavilions began in 1880, next to the fish market. That was how other vendors found themselves with a roof over their heads. 

 

All of the buildings were constructed on the sea area created by filling. The architect used the top solutions of his time by utilising steel grid-like construction and glass. He remained faithful to the previous, historical experiences in other construction elements by decorating the façades with reliefs depicting fruit and vegetables. The three buildings became the backbone of the new residential area. Nevertheless, the fish market became less and less hygienic in the face of a developing city, so a decision was made to build a new one. Carlo Pergoli, an architect from Rijeka, was assigned the job and the construction began prior to the WWI. In 1914, after the fish storage building was completed, the construction of the main building lasted until 1916. In his architectural shaping, Pergoli displayed his love for the Vienna secession. This can clearly be seen in the stone decorations, the work of Venetian sculptor Urban Bottasso. 

 

The work includes capitals, four fountains within the fish market, decorations and the façade. Bottasso placed around the pillars and on the façade a vast sea world with such skill, almost as if he was the one working as a fish vendor. Stone crabs, octopuses, fish and seashells have a lifelike effect, calling for passers-by to enter the fish market and find there something for their dining table.